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Rising costs mean tyre management becoming more important to fleets

While operators of EVs are reporting different experiences, the central fact is that electric cars and vans are significantly heavier than petrol and diesel vehicles and, whatever technology is used in their tyres, simple physics means they are likely to wear faster. It is expected that other SMR costs associated with EVs will be lower than internal combustion engine cars and vans, so tyres are likely to become a higher proportion of overall spending.
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10 May 2023

RISING costs mean that tyre management is becoming the dominant factor in everyday fleet running costs, FleetCheck is reporting.

The fleet software specialist says that tyres now regularly account for more than 50% of fleet service, maintenance and repair (SMR) budgets – a situation that the arrival of electric vehicles (EVs) will only make more acute.

Managing Director Peter Golding said: “A trend appears to be emerging where tyre costs are forming such a large proportion of overall fleet SMR spending that increasing attempts are being made to proactively manage them, in much the same way as currently happens with fuel.

“Factors such as cornering at high speed, clipping kerbs and driving through potholes can have a very definite effect on tyre life and, to a greater or lesser extent, are the result of driving style. In a similar manner to how some fleets now monitor their drivers to ensure they meet minimum standards in terms of fuel consumption, we’re expecting more to track tyre wear and, in cases where it appears to be excessive, to attempt to manage behaviour on the road.

“We’re already working with some of our fleet customers in this area, helping them to produce reporting based on real world data that will enable them to build a picture of their tyre use and take appropriate action. Of course, this kind of information also means they can see which tyre brands are performing the best when it comes to wear performance and to compare this to pricing.”

Golding added that the arrival of EVs on fleets were likely to add to tyre costs in the longer term, adding to pressure to proactively manage the situation.

“While operators of EVs are reporting different experiences, the central fact is that electric cars and vans are significantly heavier than petrol and diesel vehicles and, whatever technology is used in their tyres, simple physics means they are likely to wear faster.

“It is expected that other SMR costs associated with EVs will be lower than internal combustion engine cars and vans, so tyres are likely to become a higher proportion of overall spending. It’s looking more and more likely that, as the decade progresses, tyres are going to be the key focus for everyday running costs.”

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Chris Wright

Chris Wright

Chris Wright has been covering the automotive industry nationally and internationally for 30 years. Following spells with consumer titles he became News Editor of Automotive Management (AM), Editor of Automotive International, International Editor for Detroit-based Automotive News, and Editor of Dealer Update. He has also co-authored several FT Management Reports and contributes regularly to Justauto.com

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